• Completed Actions
      • In 2016, The Nature Conservancy launched the Chesapeake Bay Fish Passage Prioritization Project to help natural resource managers identify the fish passage restoration projects that would most benefit migratory and resident fish. The tool also allows users to develop custom management scenarios and model the potential effects of a fish passage restoration projects at a given dam.
      • In May 2017, the Fish Passage Workgroup gained formal Chesapeake Bay Program acceptance of the methodology behind the “miles opened” metric to support its definition of an upstream functional network.
      • In February and October of 2017, partners held the first and second meetings of the Pennsylvania Aquatic Connectivity Team. The Maryland Fish Passage Team has met regularly since 2007 to discuss fish passage issues specific to the state. The state of Virginia’s analog is called the Virginia Stream Barrier Task Force who has also met regularly since 2017.
      • Partners have supported the removal of the Bloede Dam on the Patapsco River in Maryland and the Monumental Mills Dam along Hazel River in Culpepper County, Virginia. In addition, six dams have been removed in Pennsylvania: Dugan Run, Wildcat Run, the Camp Michaux Lower Dam, the Eckenrode Mills Dam, the Mountain Springs Dam 2 and the Solomons Creek Dam.
  • Watershed-Wide Actions

    Ongoing

    • Supporting dam removal projects, including the removal of Daniels Dam.
    • Establishing or continuing relationships with state dam safety programs to coordinate dam removal work.
    • Continue road/stream crossing assessments, project development and project implementation.
    • Consult with the Chesapeake Bay Program Communications Workgroup to develop communications products.
    • Monitoring all dam removals funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the presence or absence of target fish species.
    • Conduct Tier II monitoring on select dam removals (Currently, the Patapsco River monitoring is the only river designated as a Tier II site by NOAA)
    • Continue to develop environmental DNA (eDNA) tool to detect shad. Continue sampling for river herring and apply river herring eDNA analysis to determine priority fish passage projects and develop habitat use models.
    • Continue using the Chesapeake Bay Fish Passage Project to implement high priority dam removal, culvert and fish passage projects.

    2021

    • Continue dam removal activities in the Chesapeake Bay including completing removal of the Bloede Dam (monitoring phase) and a feasibility/design study for Daniels Dam.
    • Develop Fish Friendly Road-Stream Crossing Design Guidance.
    • Develop Dam Removal Mitigation Crediting Guidance for future mitigation projects to incentivize future dam removal projects.

    2022

    • Conduct Tier II monitoring on select dam removals (currently, the Patapsco River monitoring is the only river designated as a Tier II site by NOAA).
  • Actions in Maryland
    • Pursuing dam removal incentive programs. (Ongoing)
    • Develop Fish Friendly Road-Stream Crossing Guidance. (Ongoing)
  • Actions in Pennsylvania
    • Hold regular meetings (at least once each year) of the Pennsylvania Aquatic Connectivity Team to support the efficient acquisition of funding and partners. (Ongoing)
  • Actions in Virginia
    • Conduct target species monitoring of select dam removals in VA (+/- and relative abundance). (Ongoing)
    • Conduct target species counts at technical fishways in VA. (Ongoing)
    • Continue annual backpack electrofishing at Claiborne Run nature-like fishway (herring).
    • Continue boat electrofishing upstream of Harvell Dam removal on the Appomattox River and Embrey Dam removal on the Rappahannock River. In Virginia, all four alosine species have been documented in the Rappahannock five miles upstream of the Embrey Dam removal. American Shad, Blueback Herring and Striped Bass have been documented as far as 28 miles upstream of the removal.