• Progress

    In this outcome, urban tree canopy is broadly defined as tree plantings in communities of any size—including urban, suburban and rural—that are not on agricultural lands. Each watershed jurisdiction will have its own annual and long-term planning targets that will contribute to the 2,400 acre-goal. While these jurisdictions do report urban tree planting data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, most do not yet have comprehensive or consistent tracking, reporting or verification systems in place. Furthermore, a high-resolution aerial tree canopy assessment—which would track net gain or loss of tree canopy over time—is still in the process of being completed for the entire watershed. As such, a more robust estimate of the baseline for this outcome is being developed.

    Expanding tree cover in communities can benefit people and the environment. Increased tree canopy can enhance air quality, water quality, energy savings, public health and community investment.

  • Management Strategy

    To achieve the tree canopy outcome, participating partners have committed to:

    • Supporting training and information-sharing within the urban forestry community;
    • Helping partners determine how to develop and fund urban tree canopy programs;
    • Expanding community engagement in urban tree canopy implementation;
    • Supporting efforts to better incentivize tree canopy planting and protection; and
    • Supporting the development of watershed-wide high-resolution urban tree canopy data and other user-friendly tracking and verification systems.

    These partners will also collaborate with the work being done to achieve the citizen stewardship, climate adaptation, climate monitoring and assessment, diversity, environmental literacy planning, forest buffer, local leadership, student and sustainable schools outcomes.

    Monitoring and assessing progress toward the outcome will occur through data related to urban tree plantings and gains or losses of tree canopy over time.

    As part of the Chesapeake Bay Program’s partnership-wide implementation of adaptive management, progress toward this outcome will be reviewed and discussed by the Management Board in November of 2017.

  • Work Plan
    Chesapeake Bay Program partners have committed to taking specific actions over the course of 2016 and 2017 to achieve the high-level approaches identified in the management strategy above.
  • Participating Partners

    The Forestry Workgroup, which is part of the Water Quality Goal Implementation Team, leads the effort to achieve this outcome. It works in partnership with the Vital Habitats Goal Implementation Team.

    Participating partners include:

    • Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (State of Delaware)
    • Delaware Forest Service (State of Delaware)
    • Maryland Forest Service (State of Maryland)
    • New York Department of Environmental Conservation Division of Lands and Forests (State of New York)
    • Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Bureau of Forestry (Commonwealth of Pennsylvania)
    • Virginia Department of Forestry (Commonwealth of Virginia)
    • West Virginia Division of Forestry (State of West Virginia)
    • Department of Energy and Environment (District of Columbia)
    • District Department of Transportation Urban Forestry Administration (District of Columbia)
    • Chesapeake Bay Commission
    • Forest Service (U.S. Department of Agriculture)
    • National Park Service
    • U.S. Department of Defense
    • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
    • U.S. Geological Survey
    • Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay
    • Cacapon Institute